19. The Brunswick

Known then as the Devonshire Arms this building was described as a “Substantial new stone house” in the 1824 sale of Wetherby.
It provided an assembly room. Pens for sheep and pigs where erected and surrounded the Brunswick on market days and it has the only remaining stable yard.

The Dictionary of Pub Names states “Named after the Duke of Brunswick who lived in England for several years and was killed while fighting for the British side at Waterloo.”

It was built some time between 1811 and 1824 this building is typical of the style advocated in the Duke of Devonshire‘s plan as prepared by the York architect Peter Atkinson

1824 Sale of Wetherby map Lot 8 Devonshire Arms Copyright:Wetherby Historical Trust

In the SALE OF WETHERBY, on Monday 11 October 1824, LOT 7 was listed in the Sale catalogue as follows –

The DEVONSHIRE ARMS INN, in High Street, a substantial New Stone-Built House, slated, containing on the GROUND FLOOR, Two Parlours in Front, Bar, Kitchen Scullery, and Cellar; on the FIRST FLOOR, a large Room in front used as an Assembly Room, and 3 good Bed Chambers On the SECOND FLOOR 5 Chambers a Garret, and a Dark Room; an Inner Yard; in the Outer Yard a range of newly erected Stone Buildings Tiled comprising 2 Box Stables, Standing for Two carriages, A 4-Stall Stable and Posting Horse Stable for 8 Horses with Granaries And Lofts over the Whole.

Before the Car became a popular thing and the cattle market became a indoor event the pens for sheep and pigs, used to line the streets of which traces can still be seen in the walls of buildings around the area of Victoria Street,

The Brunswick closed in 2003 and reopened as Harris’s Bar.”

In the spring of 2012 Harris’s Bar closed. It remained closed for several months and in October 2012 it re-opened as “The Brunswick”.

In late 2018 The Brunswick closed and was advertised “For Sale”. In December 2018 it has been sold for development and appears to have ceased to be a ‘pub’.